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Report: ATE Indicators of Productivity: Six-Year Trends 2000-2005

Posted on May 14, 2019 by , , in Report Archive ()

This report presents findings across six annual surveys of Advanced Technological Education (ATE) grantees conducted by The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University from 2000 to 2005. To create this report, we selected variables for which we had data across this span of years and ones that we believe serve as best descriptors of this program. Our purpose was solely to summarize information provided by ATE grantees about their activity and productivity.

In sum, the aggregate information describes important attributes of the ATE program’s size, activities, direction, and productivity. Because our purpose was to provide feedback rather than evaluative judgments or guidance, we refrained from making inferences as to what the findings mean or what actions should be taken based on the findings. This report is intended for use by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in planning program activities, assessing program progress, and preparing annual testimony and reports. ATE grantees may use these findings to assess their own status and learn about the performance of other grantees, which may serve their own improvement needs.

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Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Carl Hanssen, Chris Coryn

Report: Final ATE Evaluation Report (2006)

Posted on May 14, 2019 by , , , in Report Archive ()

This report describes the basis from which the ATE program was created and conducted and the evaluation work that has shadowed this program for the past seven years. It traces the program’s work and reach to community colleges and others since the beginning of the ATE program. It analyzes ATE solicitations to show linkages between the program guidelines and program productivity and then describes this evaluation’s design and data collection methods to show why and how evaluative data were collected. The following evaluation findings both describe and judge the program in various respects.

Findings from the evaluation show that the program is healthy and well run. Nearly a fifth of the nation’s two-year colleges have been funded at least once by this program, and those funds have resulted in substantial productivity in funded and collaborating institutions and organizations. Major strengths of this program are evident in its materials development, professional development, and program improvement products. Large numbers of students and teachers have participated in this program—taking courses and graduating or otherwise being certified. Business and industry have collaborated with colleges in developing and conducting these programs with perceived substantial benefits from that involvement.

Multiple strands of evaluative information describe and confirm that the program produces important outcomes of good quality. Though consistently positive, these findings are highly dependent on testimony/feedback as a primary quality assurance mechanism. We believe additional project/center-based direct evidence of program effectiveness and quality would strengthen claims of quality and provide important information for program improvement. Suggestions are made that we believe will improve the ATE program; these suggestions are viewed as small changes designed for incremental improvement.

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Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Chris Coryn, Frances Lawrenz, Lori Wingate

Report: ATE Program Evaluation: Contributors and inhibitors influencing program improvement

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , in

This brief focuses on project/center evaluation and is divided into 4 sections. This section, Section 1, provides an overview of ATE expectations for evaluation and principal investigators’ responses that describe how they meet those requirements—who conducts the evaluations, how much money is spent on evaluations, and the extent to which these evaluations vary by characteristics such as the type of grant and type of evaluator conducting the evaluation. Section 2 describes PI perceptions of the utility of their evaluations and the extent to which PI perceptions of utility are related to the evaluation characteristics described in Section 1. Section 3 focuses on the activities of external evaluators — PI satisfaction with these evaluators, the relationship between PI ratings and standards for sound program evaluations, whether the PIs view their evaluations as meeting ATE intellectual merit requirements, and PIs’ characterizations of the attributes of their external evaluators. Section 4 draws together findings reported in Sections 1 to 3 to identify strengths and weaknesses of project-level evaluations and to suggest changes that appear likely to improve on current evaluation practices.

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Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Chris Coryn, Liesel Ritchie

Report: ATE Program Evaluation: Project level evaluation practices

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , in

This study analyzes project-level evaluation practices occurring in the Advanced Technological Education program of the National Science Foundation. Of special interest in this study were factors thought to affect the quality and utility of evaluations such as the cost of evaluations, who engaged in evaluation planning, and the use of external evaluators. The ATE program requires project-level evaluations and provides guidelines regarding what evaluations can and should do. The report closes with a discussion of discrepancies between expectations and project level actions and the apparent strengths and weaknesses of project evaluations. Suggestions are offered on how to improve these evaluation practices.

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Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Chris Coryn, Liesel Ritchie

Report: Assessing the impact and effectiveness of the ATE program Volume 3 (2004)

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , in

This report, Volume 3 of the 2004 Annual Survey Report, focuses on the following fundamental elements of the ATE program:

1) What is the size and scope of work for ATE projects?

2) To what degree do ATE projects apply rigorous internal practices in their operations?

3) How extensive are ATE project collaborations?

4) How productive are ATE projects in terms of the primary ATE work categories?

5) What impact are ATE projects having on students?

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Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Carl Hanssen, Chris Coryn

Report: Assessing the impact and effectiveness of the ATE program Volume 2 (2004)

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , in

This report, Volume 2 of the 2004 Annual Survey Report, specifically addresses the following fundamental elements of the ATE centers:

1) What are the size and the scope of work for ATE centers?

2) To what degree do ATE centers apply rigorous internal practices in their operations?

3) How extensive are ATE center collaborations?

4) How productive are ATE centers in terms of the primary ATE work categories?

5) What impact are ATE centers having on students?

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Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Carl Hanssen, Chris Coryn

Report: 2005 ATE Survey Technical Report – Processes Procedures and Results

Posted on October 1, 2014 by , in

This technical report presents the processes and procedures employed by The Evaluation Center in its annual survey of National Science Foundation ATE Program grantees; using the sixth annual survey (2005) data.

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Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Carl Hanssen, Chris Coryn

Report: Advanced Technological Education Program Evlauation Project Implementation: Challenges and Resolutions

Posted on January 21, 2010 by , , in

This brief examines the major challenges and resolutions associated with ATE project implementation, as reported by project and center principal investigators (PIs). Ten challenges were identified. Of these, “difficulty recruiting students,” “changes in industry served,” and “lack of institutional administrative support/interest,” were identified as the most important. Examining projects and centers as two separate entities, “difficulty recruiting students” retained its number one ranking, although differences emerge d in rankings between projects and centers in the remaining issues. There were
also distinctions between ratings of challenges identified by PIs of 2- and 4-year institutions, with 2-year institutions ranking “difficulty recruiting students” as most important and 4-year institutions ranking “project/center staff/personnel turnover” as their greatest challenge. Overall, these findings suggest that a large majority of possible challenges to ATE project implementation were either not identified by PIs as important or had been at least partially resolved. Although the challenges discussed in this brief are important at the level of individual ATE projects and centers, none are substantial enough to raise concern on a programmatic level.

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Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Chris Coryn, Liesel Ritchie