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Report: Final ATE Evaluation Report (2006)

Posted on May 14, 2019 by , , , in Report Archive ()

This report describes the basis from which the ATE program was created and conducted and the evaluation work that has shadowed this program for the past seven years. It traces the program’s work and reach to community colleges and others since the beginning of the ATE program. It analyzes ATE solicitations to show linkages between the program guidelines and program productivity and then describes this evaluation’s design and data collection methods to show why and how evaluative data were collected. The following evaluation findings both describe and judge the program in various respects.

Findings from the evaluation show that the program is healthy and well run. Nearly a fifth of the nation’s two-year colleges have been funded at least once by this program, and those funds have resulted in substantial productivity in funded and collaborating institutions and organizations. Major strengths of this program are evident in its materials development, professional development, and program improvement products. Large numbers of students and teachers have participated in this program—taking courses and graduating or otherwise being certified. Business and industry have collaborated with colleges in developing and conducting these programs with perceived substantial benefits from that involvement.

Multiple strands of evaluative information describe and confirm that the program produces important outcomes of good quality. Though consistently positive, these findings are highly dependent on testimony/feedback as a primary quality assurance mechanism. We believe additional project/center-based direct evidence of program effectiveness and quality would strengthen claims of quality and provide important information for program improvement. Suggestions are made that we believe will improve the ATE program; these suggestions are viewed as small changes designed for incremental improvement.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Chris Coryn, Frances Lawrenz, Lori Wingate

Report: Assessing the Impact and Effectiveness of the ATE Program

Posted on October 9, 2014 by , , , in

This report was prepared as an analysis of the first annual status report. It was meant to help understand the ATE program, and make preparations for upcoming surveys and site visits.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Frances Lawrenz, Gloria Tressler, Sharon Barbour

Report: Evaluation of Materials Produced by the ATE Program

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , in

This report describes the outcomes and processes used to determine expert opinion of the
quality of materials developed through the ATE program. A detailed scoring rubric was
developed based on existing research and expert review, and experts in technological
fields, instructional design, and technological education used the rubric to review the
materials. Of the 65 projects and centers that had reported being involved in materials
development on the yearly ATE survey in 2002, 37 responded to our request to send us a
copy of their best material to review. Preliminary review reduced the number of
materials to 29 judged suitable and sufficiently complete for review.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Frances Lawrenz, Jim Appleton, Jonathan Keiser

Report: Assessing the impact and effectiveness of the ATE program (2003)

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , in

This report presents results from the fourth annual survey of ATE projects. Intended as a means to provide evidence of the work of ATE projects and centers, this survey is part of a larger effort to evaluate the ATE program.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Carl Hanssen, Frances Lawrenz

Report: Survey of ATE Projects and Centers (2002)

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , in

This third annual survey of projects and centers describes these projects’ efforts and impacts and through them provides insights to the parent National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. When combined with other information and criteria, these annual descriptive findings and indices provide a basis for judging the overall impact and effectiveness of the ATE program. Findings from this survey are expected to be useful to NSF staff in preparing their annual GPRA reports and making programmatic decisions. ATE projects are likely to use survey results to learn about the activities and findings of other projects and to serve their own improvement needs.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Frances Lawrenz, Nanette Keiser

Report: The ATE program: Issues for consideration, a monograph

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , , , , , , , , in

This report addresses nine issues of interest to ATE program stakeholders: Collaboration, dissemination, materials development, professional development, program improvement, advisory committees, evaluation, recruitment and retention,and sustainability.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Arlen Gullickson, Frances Lawrenz, Gloria Rogers, Gloria Tressler, Karen Powe, Lester Reed, Norman Gold, Thomas Owens, Wayne Welch

Report: Sustainability: Increasing the likelihood of long term impact by the ATE program

Posted on October 8, 2014 by , in

Sustainability is the ability to prolong or to supply with sustenance. This straightforward
definition takes on a much more complex character when considered in relation to the
Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program because of the diverse nature of this
program (i.e., operates under several drivers [e.g., collaboration, program improvement] and makes awards to projects and centers). Setting these complexities aside, in a simple
sense, sustainability for the ATE program could mean continuation of whatever activities
had been supported by the NSF grant, including institutionalization. This is consistent
with the definition given for sustainability by the Community College Research Center
(CCRC) in their study of the ATE program as well. They defined sustainability as “The
state where the major activities involved in the ATE program continue even after the
grant expires.” Naturally, outcomes or processes that are not successful or of high quality
should not be sustained. This places a burden on the ATE projects (i.e., projects and
centers) and NSF to determine where efforts for sustainability should be focused.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Frances Lawrenz, Nanette Keiser

Report: Assessing the Value Added by NSF’s ATE Program: Business and Industry Perspective’s Cross-Site Analysis Report

Posted on October 1, 2014 by , , , in

This report presents the results from a targeted study designed to address the accountability of the ATE program in terms of its impact on the business and industry workforce.

File: Click Here
Type: Report
Category: ATE Research & Evaluation
Author(s): Amy Germuth, Arlen Gullickson, Carl Hanssen, Frances Lawrenz