Miranda Lee

EvaluATE Blog Editor, The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University

Miranda Lee is a project manager at the Evaluation Center at Western Michigan Unviersity. She is also a doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Evaluation program. Her primary responsibilities with EvaluATE involve the maintenance of our contact list and our database of evaluation data, conduct of the annual survey, webmaster, and contributor to various EvaluATE products.


Webinar: Outcome Evaluation: Step-by-Step

Posted on December 12, 2016 by , in Webinars

Presenter(s): Lori Wingate, Miranda Lee
Date(s): March 22, 2017
Time: 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern
Recording: https://youtu.be/KGadLB–WZM

Outcome evaluation involves identifying and measuring the changes that occur as a result of project implementation. These changes may occur at the individual, organizational, or community levels and include changes in knowledge, skills, attitudes, behavior, and community/societal conditions. All too often, however, evaluations focus on project activities, rather than meaningful outcomes. Webinar participants will learn how to identify appropriate outcomes to assess in an evaluation and how to use those intended outcomes as a foundation for planning or enhancing data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

Resources:
Slides
Handout

Webinar: Small-Scale Evaluation

Posted on December 12, 2016 by , , in Webinars

Presenter(s): Elaine Craft, Lori Wingate, Miranda Lee
Date(s): February 15, 2017
Time: 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern
Recording: https://youtu.be/IX4trZgsuMc

Small-scale projects need small-scale evaluation. Properly scoping an evaluation for a small project requires defining realistic process and outcome indicators and maximizing use of limited resources. In addition, evaluations need to be planned to produce timely and compelling evidence to set the stage for future funding and project growth. In the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program, “small grants” are $200,000 or less over three years, awarded to community colleges that have not been funded by ATE within the past 10 years. Webinar participants will learn the basics of small-scale evaluation, using a typical ATE small project as the case example.

This webinar is an updated version of EvaluATE’s March 2016 webinar, Small Project Evaluation: Principles and Practices.

Resources:
Slides
Handout

Webinar: Logic Models: Getting Them Right and Using Them Well

Posted on July 13, 2016 by , in Webinars

Presenter(s): Lori Wingate, Miranda Lee
Date(s): August 17, 2016
Time: 1-2:00 p.m.
Recording: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4PY1KH9R0w

A logic model is a succinct graphic depiction of how a project translates its resources and activities into outcomes. A good logic model efficiently communicates the overall logic and purpose of a project and serves as a foundation for evaluation planning. A logic model can be a powerful addition to your funding proposal, but only if it is well aligned to your project’s narrative description. In this session, participants will learn (a) how to create a project logic model, while avoiding common mistakes (like confusing outcomes with activities or outputs and providing too many or too few details), and (b) how to effectively integrate a logic model into a funding proposal.

Resources:
Slides
Handout
Logic Model Template

Webinar: Small Project Evaluation: Principles and Practices

Posted on February 10, 2016 by , , , , in Webinars

Presenter(s): Charlotte Forrest, Elaine Craft, Lori Wingate, Miranda Lee, Russell Cannon
Date(s): March 23, 2016
Time: 1-2:30 p.m. EDT
Recording: https://youtu.be/WUFTMyyRgyU

An effective small project evaluation requires a clear-cut and feasible project plan, an evaluation plan that matches the project’s scope and purpose, and a project team and external evaluator who are willing and able to share responsibility for implementing the evaluation. In this webinar, we will review foundational principles of small project evaluation and discuss strategies for putting them into practice for a high-quality, economical, and useful evaluation of a small project.

Webinar participants will be able to

  1. Create or refine a project logic model that accurately represents a project’s activities and intended outcomes as a foundation for an evaluation plan.
  2. Develop evaluation questions that are appropriate for a small project.
  3. Identify project process and outcome indicators for answering the evaluation questions.

Resources:
Slides
Handout

Webinar: 2 for 1: The Retrospective Pretest Method for Evaluating Training

Posted on October 13, 2015 by , , in Webinars (, )

Presenter(s): Goldie MacDonald, Lori Wingate, Miranda Lee
Date(s): December 9, 2015
Time: 1-2:30 p.m. EDT
Recording: https://youtu.be/cQ25jh5rrvk

The retrospective pretest method for evaluating professional development activities requires participants to rate their knowledge and abilities before and after a training activity. Participants answer pre- and post-test questions at the end of the training only, rather than at the beginning and the end. This method is an efficient and informative option to evaluate training outcomes and quality and provides a sound and consistent measure of participant growth that can be used to compare training activities at a single event or over time. Adult learners tend to be more accepting of this assessment method than traditional knowledge tests, and the threat of response-shift bias associated with the traditional pre-post method is reduced.

Lori Wingate, director of EvaluATE, will provide an overview of the method and discuss design, analysis, and use. Goldie MacDonald, Health Scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will share her experience using this method to evaluate and improve workshops she led this year in the U.S. and overseas.

Webinar participants will learn how to:

  1. Design retrospective pretest questions.
  2. Analyze and report data gathered using this method.
  3. Use the evaluation data to demonstrate accountability for resources dedicated to training, improve the training, and plan for future training or its evaluation.

Resources:
Slides
Handout