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Blog: Project Data for Evaluation: Google Groups Project Team Feedback

Posted on February 11, 2016 by  in Blog

President and CEO, Censeo Group

At Censeo Group, a program evaluation firm located in northeast Ohio, we are evaluating a number of STEM projects and often face the challenge of how to collect valid and reliable data about the impact of curriculum implementation: What implementation looks like, students’ perceptions of the program, project leaders’ comfort with lessons, and the extent to which students find project activities engaging and beneficial.

We use various methods to gather curriculum implementation data. Observations offer a glimpse into how faculty deliver new curriculum materials and how students interact and react to those materials, but are time-intensive and require clear observation goals and tools. Feedback surveys offer students and staff the opportunity to provide responses that support improvement or provide a summative analysis of the implementation, but not everyone responds and some responses may be superficial. During a recent project, we were able to use an ongoing, rich, genuine, and helpful source of project information for the purpose of evaluation.

Google Groups Blog

Project leaders created a Google Group and invited all project staff and the evaluation team to join with the following message:

“Welcome to our Google Group! This will be a format for sharing updates from interventions and our sites each week. Thanks for joining in our discussion!”

The team chose Google Groups because everybody was comfortable with the environment, and it is free, easy to use and easy to access.

Organizing the Posts

Project leaders created a prompt each week, asking staff to “Post experiences from Week X below.” This chronological method of organization kept each week’s feedback clustered. However, a different organizing principle could be used, for example, curriculum unit or school.

In the case of this Google Group, the simple prompt resonated well with project staff, who wrote descriptive and reflective entries. Graduate students, who were delivering a new curriculum to high school students, offered recommendations for colleagues who would be teaching the content later in the week about how to organize instruction, engage students, manage technology, or address questions that were asked during their lessons. Graduate students also referred to each other’s posts, indicating that this interactive method of project communication was useful and helpful for them as they worked in the schools, for example, in organizing materials or modifying lessons based on available time or student interest.

Capturing and Analyzing the Data 

The evaluation team used NVIVO’s NCapture, a Web browser add-on for NVIVO qualitative data analysis software that allows the blog posts to be quickly imported into the software for analysis. Once in NVIVO, the team coded the data to analyze the successes and challenges of using the new curriculum in the high schools.

Genuine and Ongoing Data

The project team is now implementing the curriculum for the second time with a new group of students. Staff members are posting weekly feedback about this second implementation. This ongoing use of the Google Group blog will allow the evaluation team to analyze and compare implementation by semester (Fall 2015 versus Spring 2016), by staff type (reveal changes in graduate students’ skills and experience), by school, and other relevant categories.

From a strictly data management perspective, a weekly survey of project staff using a tool such as Google Forms or an online survey system, from which data could be transferred directly into a spreadsheet, likely would have been easier to manage and analyze. However, the richness of the data that the Google Groups entries generated was well worth the trade-off of the extra time required to capture and upload each post. Rather than giving staff an added “evaluation” activity that was removed from the work of the project, and to which likely not all staff would have responded as enthusiastically, these blog posts provided evaluation staff with a glimpse into real-time, genuine staff communication and classroom implementation challenges and successes. The ongoing feedback about students’ reactions to specific activities supported project implementation by helping PIs understand which materials needed to be enhanced to support students of different skill levels as the curriculum was being delivered. The blog posts also provided insights into the graduate students’ comfort with the curriculum materials and highlighted the need for additional training for them about specific STEM careers. The blog allowed PIs to quickly make changes during the semester and provided the evaluation team with information about how the curriculum was being implemented and how changes affected the project over the course of the semester.

You can find additional information about NVIVO here: http://www.qsrinternational.com/product. The site includes training resources and videos about NVIVO.

You can learn how to create and use a Google Group at the Google Groups Help Center:
https://support.google.com/groups/?hl=en#topic=9216