Archive: planning

Blog: Evaluation Plan Cheat Sheets: Using Evaluation Plan Summaries to Assist with Project Management

Posted on October 10, 2018 by , in Blog ()
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

We are Kelly Robertson and Lyssa Wilson Becho, and we work on EvaluATE as well as several other projects at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University. We wanted to share a trick that has helped us keep track of our evaluation activities and better communicate the details of an evaluation plan with our clients. To do this, we take the most important information from an evaluation plan and create a summary that can serve as a quick-reference guide for the evaluation management process. We call these “evaluation plan cheat sheets.”

The content of each cheat sheet is determined by the information needs of the evaluation team and clients. Cheat sheets can serve the needs of the evaluation team (for example, providing quick reminders of delivery dates) or of the client (for example, giving a reminder of when data collection activities occur). Examples of items we like to include on our cheat sheets are shown in Figures 1-3 and include the following:

  • A summary of deliverables noting which evaluation questions each deliverable will answer. In the table at the top of Figure 1, we indicate which report will answer which evaluation question. Letting our clients know which questions are addressed in each deliverable helps to set their expectations for reporting. This is particularly useful for evaluations that require multiple types of deliverables.
  • A timeline of key data collection activities and report draft due dates. On the bottom of Figure 1, we visualize a timeline with simple icons and labels. This allows the user to easily scan the entirety of the evaluation plan. We recommend including important dates for deliverables and data collection. This helps both the evaluation team and the client stay on schedule.
  • A data collection matrix. This is especially useful for evaluations with a lot of data collection sources. The example shown in Figure 2 identifies who implements the instrument, when the instrument will be implemented, the purpose of the instrument, and the data source. It is helpful to identify who is responsible for data collection activities in the cheat sheet, so nothing gets missed. If the client is responsible for collecting much of the data in the evaluation plan, we include a visual breakdown of when data should be collected (shown at the bottom of Figure 2).
  • A progress table for evaluation deliverables. Despite the availability of project management software with fancy Gantt charts, sometimes we like to go back to basics. We reference a simple table, like the one in Figure 3, during our evaluation team meetings to provide an overview of the evaluation’s status and avoid getting bogged down in the details.

Importantly, include the client and evaluator contact information in the cheat sheet for quick reference (see Figure 1). We also find it useful to include a page footer with a “modified on” date that automatically updates when the document is saved. That way, if we need to update the plan, we can be sure we are working on the most recent version.

 

Figure 1. Cheat Sheet Example Page 1. (Click to enlarge.)

Figure 2. Cheat Sheet Example Page 2. (Click to enlarge)

Figure 3. Cheat Sheet Example Page 2 (Click to enlarge.)

 

Blog: Evaluation Feedback Is a Gift

Posted on July 3, 2018 by  in Blog ()

Chemistry Faculty, Anoka-Ramsey Community College

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I’m Christopher Lutz, chemistry faculty at Anoka-Ramsey Community College. When our project was initially awarded, I was a first-time National Science Foundation (NSF) principal investigator. I understood external evaluation was required for grants but saw it as an administrative hurdle in the grant process. I viewed evaluation as proof for the NSF that we did the project and as a metric for outcomes. While both of these aspects are important, I learned evaluation is also an opportunity to monitor and improve your process and grant. Working with our excellent external evaluators, we built a stronger program in our grant project. You can too, if you are open to evaluation feedback.

Our evaluation team was composed of an excellent evaluator and a technical expert. I started working with both about halfway through the proposal development process (a few months before submission) to ensure they could contribute to the project. I recommend contacting evaluators during the initial stages of proposal development and checking in several times before submission. This gives adequate time for your evaluators to develop a quality evaluation plan and gives you time to understand how to incorporate your evaluator’s advice. Our funded project yielded great successes, but we could have saved time and achieved more if we had involved our evaluators earlier in the process.

After receiving funding, we convened grant personnel and evaluators for a face-to-face meeting to avoid wasted effort at the project start. Meeting in person allowed us to quickly collaborate on a deep level. For example, our project evaluator made real-time adjustments to the evaluation plan as our academic team and technical evaluator worked to plan our project videos and training tools. Include evaluator travel funds in your budget and possibly select an evaluator who is close by. We did not designate travel funds for our Kansas-based evaluator, but his ties to Minnesota and understanding of the value of face-to-face collaboration led him to use some of his evaluation salary to travel and meet with our team.

Here are three ways we used evaluation feedback to strengthen our project:

Example 1: The first-year evaluation report showed a perceived deficiency in the project’s provision of hands-on experience with MALDI-MS instrumentation. In response, we had students make small quantities of liquid solution instead of giving pre-mixed solutions, and let them analyze more lab samples. This change required minimal time but led students to regard the project’s hands-on nature as a strength in the second-year evaluation.

Example 2: Another area for improvement was students’ lack of confidence in analyzing data. In response to this feedback, project staff create Excel data analysis tools and a new training activity for students to practice with literature data prior to analyzing their own. The subsequent year’s evaluation report indicated increased student confidence.

Example 3: Input from our technical evaluator allowed us to create videos that have been used in academic institutions in at least three US states, the UK’s Open University system, and Iceland.

Provided here are some overall tips:

  1. Work with your evaluator(s) early in the proposal process to avoid wasted effort.
  2. Build in at least one face-to-face meeting with your evaluator(s).

Review evaluation data and reports with the goal of improving your project in the next year.

Consider external evaluators as critical friends who are there to help improve your project. This will help move your project forward and help you have a greater impact for all.