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Blog: Quick Reference Guides Evaluators Can’t Live Without

Posted on August 5, 2020 by  in Blog

Senior Research Associate, The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University

* This blog was originally published on AEA365 on May 15, 2020:
https://aea365.org/blog/quick-reference-guides-evaluators-cant-live-without-by-kelly-robertson/

My name is Kelly Robertson, and I work at The Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University and EvaluATE, the National Science Foundation–funded evaluation hub for Advanced Technological Education.

I’m a huge fan of quick reference guides. Quick reference guides are brief summaries of important content that can be used to improve practice in real time. They’re also commonly referred to as job aids or cheat sheets.

I found quick reference guides to be especially helpful when I was just learning about evaluation. For example, Thomas Guskey’s Five Critical Levels of Professional Development Evaluation helped me learn about different levels of outcomes (e.g., reaction, learning, organizational support, application of skills, and target population outcomes).

Even with 10-plus years of experience, I still turn to quick reference guides every now and then. Here are a few of my personal favorites:

My colleague Lyssa Becho is also a huge fan of quick reference guides, and together we compiled a list of over 50 evaluation-related quick reference guides. The list draws on the results from a survey we conducted as part of our work at EvaluATE. It includes quick reference guides that 45 survey respondents rated as most useful for each stage of the evaluation process.

Here are some popular quick reference guides from the list:

  • Evaluation Planning: Patton’s Evaluation Flash Cards introduce core evaluation concepts such as evaluation questions, standards, and reporting in an easily accessible format.
  • Evaluation Design: Wingate’s Evaluation Data Matrix Template helps evaluators organize information about evaluation indicators, data collection sources, analysis, and interpretation.
  • Data Collection: Wingate and Schroeter’s Evaluation Questions Checklist for Program Evaluation provides criteria to help evaluators understand what constitutes high-quality evaluation questions.
  • Data Analysis: Hutchinson’s You’re Invited to a Data Party! explains how to engage stakeholders in collective data analysis.
  • Evaluation Reporting: Evergreen and Emery’s Data Visualization Checklist is a guide for the development of high-impact data visualizations. Topics covered include text, arrangement, color, and lines.

If you find any helpful evaluation-related quick reference guides are missing from the full collection please contact kelly.robertson@wmich.edu.