Archive: proposals

Newsletter: Tips for Writing the Results of Prior Support Section for NSF Proposals

Posted on July 1, 2014 by  in Newsletter - ()

Where are the hidden opportunities to positively influence proposal reviewers?  Surprisingly, this is often the Results from Prior Support section. Many proposers do not go beyond simply recounting what they did in prior grants. They miss the chance to “wow” the reader with impact examples, such as Nano-Link’s Nano-Infusion Project that has resulted in the integration and inclusion of nanoscale modules into multiple grade levels of K-14 across the nation. Teachers are empowered with tools to effectively teach nanoscale concepts as evidenced by their survey feedback. New leaders are emerging and enthusiasm for science can be seen on the videos available on the website. Because of NSF funding, additional synergistic projects allowed for scaling activities and growing a national presence.

Any PI having received NSF support in the past 5 years must include a summary of the results (up to 5 pages) and how those results support the current proposal. Because pages in this subsection count toward the total 15 pages, many people worry that they are using too much space to describe what has been done. These pages, however, can provide a punch and energy to the proposal with metrics, outcomes, and stories. This is the time to quote the evaluator’s comments and tie the results to the evaluation plan. The external view provides valuable decision-making information to the reviewers. This discussion of prior support helps reviewers evaluate the proposal, allows them to make comments, and provides evidence that the new activities will add value.According to the NSF Grant Proposal Guide, updated in 2013, the subsection must include: Award #, amount, period of support; title of the project; summary of results described under the distinct separate headings of Intellectual Merit, and Broader Impact; publications acknowledging NSF support; evidence of research products and their availability; and relation of completed work to proposed work.

The bottom line is that the beginning of the project description sets the stage for the entire proposal. Data and examples that demonstrate intellectual merit and broader impact clearly define what has been done thus leaving room for a clear description of new directions that will require funding.

 

Newsletter: What makes a good evaluation section of a proposal?

Posted on July 1, 2013 by  in Newsletter - ()

Principal Research Scientist, Education Development Center, Inc.

As a program officer, I read hundreds of proposals for different NSF programs and I saw many different approaches to writing a proposal evaluation section. From my vantage point, here are a few tips that may help to ensure that your evaluation section shines.

First, make sure to involve your evaluator in writing the proposal’s evaluation section. Program officers and reviewers can tell when an evaluation section was written without the consultation of an evaluator. This makes them think you aren’t integrating evaluation into your project planning.

Don’t just call an evaluator a couple weeks before the proposal is due! A strong evaluation section comes from a thoughtful, robust, tailored evaluation plan. This takes collaboration with an evaluator! Get them on board early and talk with them often as you develop your proposal. They can help you develop measureable objectives, add insight to proposal organization, and, of course, work with you to develop an appropriate evaluation plan.

Reviewers and program officers look to see that the evaluator understands the project. This can be done using a logic model or in a paragraph that justifies the evaluation design, based on the proposed project design. The evaluation section should also connect the project objectives and targeted outcomes to evaluation questions, data collection methods and analysis, and dissemination plans. This can be done in a matrix format, which helps the reader to see clearly which data will answer which evaluation question and how these are connected to the objectives of the project.

A strong evaluation plan shows that the evaluator and the project team are in synch and working together, applies a rigorous design and reasonable data collection methods, and answers important questions that will help to demonstrate the value of the project and surface areas for improvement.